Roberto Alomar Net Worth 2017: Short Bio & Wiki

How rich is Roberto Alomar?

Roberto Alomar net worth is
$40 Million

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Roberto Alomar Net Worth, Biography & Wiki 2017

Born Roberto Alomar Velázquez on the 5th February 1968, in Ponce, Puerto Rico, he is a retired second baseman who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for several teams, including the San Diego Padres (1988-1990), Toronto Blue Jays (1991-1995), Baltimore Orioles (1996-1998), Cleveland Indians (1999-2001), New York Mets (2002-2003), Chicago White Sox (2003), and Arizona Diamondblacks (2004). He retired in 2004, and has recently assumed a Special Advisor position to the Blue Jays.

Have you ever wondered how rich Roberto Alomar is, as of mid- 2017? According to authoritative sources, it has been estimated that Alomar’s net worth is as high as $40 million, an amount earned through his long and distinguished career as a second baseman.

Roberto Alomar Net Worth $40 Million

Roberto is the younger son born to Santos Alomar Sr. and Maria Velázquez and has an older brother, Santos Jr. who is also a successful baseball player. Their father, Santos Sr. played baseball, and as a result, the two were raised by their mother, Maria, since Santos was busy traveling with his career. Growing up in awe of his father’s brilliant career, Roberto would spend summer with his father in the States. Once he turned 17 years of age, Roberto signed a professional contract with the San Diego Padres, but played minor league for the Calls-A affiliate in Charleston. In 1986 he batted .346 which was enough to become California League batting champion. In 1988 he experienced major league baseball for the first time, playing for the Padres, and just two years later got his first All-Star appearance.

Before the end of 1990, Roberto and Joe Carter were traded to the Toronto Blue Jays for Fred McGriff and Tony Fernández. He played for the Blue Jays until 1995, during which time he developed into one of the best offensive players, preferably playing as a second baseman, and has won numerous individual awards while on the team. He has earned five All-Star appearances and won the Silver Slugger Award in 1992. Furthermore, he became World Series champion with the Blue Jays in 1992 and 1993, while in 1992 he was also named as ALCS MVP. He also posted a franchise record in batting average with .307, and thanks to these performances, Roberto received the Golden Glove Award each year he was Blue Jay.

After Toronto, Roberto became a part of the Baltimore Orioles franchise, signing a contract worth $17 million over three years, which only further increased his wealth. He played for the Orioles until 1998, and just continued where he left off in Toronto, winning another Golden Glove Award and his second Silver Slugger Award, not to mention that he appeared in his eighth, ninth and tenth All-Star games. However, he also had an altercation with John Hirschbeck of the Toronto Blue Jays, when during the game between these two teams, Roberto spat at John. As a result, Roberto was suspended for five games at the start of the 1997 season.

After Baltimore, Roberto joined the Cleveland Indians on a four-year contract, and played with his older brother who had been in Cleveland since 1990. Roberto’s numbers became ever better with .323/.422/.533 with 24 HRs, 120 RBI and 37 stolen bases in 1999, and in 2001 he batted .336/.415/.541 with 20 HRs, 100 RBI, and 30 steals. In 2001 he won his tenth Golden Glove Award, posting the record for most such Awards won by a second baseman.

In 2002 he was sent to the New York Metz for Billy Traber, Alex Escobar, and Matt Lawton. Unfortunately, his numbers began to decline, and as a result he switched teams several times in the last couple of years of his career, including to the Chicago White Sox, Arizona Diamondbacks and also signed with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays for the 2005 season, unfortunately, he didn’t make a single appearance as he had problems with his vision, and back pains, which forced him to retire.

In 2011 he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in his second year of eligibility, and is also elected into the Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame, and elevated to the Level of Excellence.

Regarding his personal life, Roberto has been married to Kim Perks since 2012; the couple has one daughter together. Previously, he was married to Maripily Rivera from 2009 to 2011.During their marriage, Roberto was allegedly aggressive towards Maripily, and she initiated divorce proceedings.

Quick Facts

Birth date: February 5, 1968
Birth place: Ponce, Puerto Rico
Weight:185 lbs (83.9 kg)
Profession:Baseball player
Nationality:American
Spouse:Kim Perks (m. 2012), Maria Del Pilar "Maripily" Rivera Alomar (m. 2009–2011)
Children:Lourdes María Alomar, Robertito Alomar, Robyn Alomar
Parents:Sandy Alomar Sr., María Velázquez
Siblings:Sandy Alomar Jr.
twitter.com/robbiealomar
imdb.com/name/nm1758580/
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roberto_Aloma


Interesting Facts

#Fact
1Father of Robyn Alomar.
2(January 17) Agreed to terms on a one-year deal with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays.
3(March 19) Announced his retirement after signing with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays.
4Inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2011.
5Spat in the face of umpire John Hirschbeck in 1996 during a heated exchange at home plate. He made matters worse by saying he thought Hirschbeck was under stress because his son had died three years earlier, prompting him to charge into the Baltimore Orioles' clubhouse looking for Alomar. Incredibly, the two later became friends.
610-time Gold Glove winner and an All-Star for 11 consecutive seasons (1991-2001). Had .300 with 2724 hits and 210 home runs in 17 seasons with the San Diego Padres (1988-1990), Toronto Blue Jays (1991-1995), Baltimore Orioles (1996-1998), Cleveland Indians (1999-2001), New York Mets (2002-2003[start]), Chicago White Sox (2003[end]-2004[start], and Arizona Diamondbacks (2004[end]). Career salary: $76,603,815.
7Was engaged to tennis star Mary Pierce.
8Won back-to-back World Series titles in 1992 and 1993. 12-time All-Star and 10-time Gold Glove winner.
9Brother of Sandy Alomar Jr.


Filmography

Self

Self

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Mr. D2015TV SeriesHimself
Prime 92010-2011TV SeriesHimself
Sunday Night Baseball1990-2004TV SeriesHimself - Toronto Blue Jays Second Baseman / Himself - New York Mets Second Baseman / Himself - Cleveland Indians Second Baseman / ...
2001 MLB All-Star Game2001TV SpecialHimself
2000 MLB All-Star Game2000TV SpecialHimself - AL Starting Second Baseman: Cleveland Indians
1999 MLB All-Star Game1999TV SpecialHimself
1998 MLB All-Star Game1998TV SpecialHimself
1997 American League Championship Series1997TV SeriesHimself - Baltimore Orioles Second Baseman
1997 MLB All-Star Game1997TV SpecialHimself - AL Starting Second Baseman: Baltimore Orioles
1996 American League Championship Series1996TV Mini-SeriesHimself - Baltimore Orioles Second Baseman
1996 MLB All-Star Game1996TV SpecialHimself
1995 MLB All-Star Game1995TV SpecialHimself - AL Second Baseman
1994 MLB All-Star Game1994TV SpecialHimself - AL Second Baseman
1993 American League Championship Series1993TV Mini-SeriesHimself - Toronto Blue Jays Second Baseman
Roberto Clemente: A Video Tribute to One of Baseball's Greatest Players and a True Humanitarian1993Video documentaryHimself
1993 MLB All-Star Game1993TV SpecialHimself - AL Second Baseman
Oh Canada! The Story of the 1992 World Champion Blue Jays1992VideoHimself
1992 American League Championship Series1992TV SeriesHimself - Toronto Blue Jays Second Baseman
1992 MLB All-Star Game1992TV SpecialHimself - AL Second Baseman
Four Million Memories: The 1991 Toronto Blue Jays Highlight Video1991Video Game documentaryHimself
1991 American League Championship Series1991TV Mini-SeriesHimself - Toronto Blue Jays Second Baseman
1991 MLB All-Star Game1991TV SpecialHimself - AL Second Baseman
1990 MLB All-Star Game1990TV SpecialHimself - NL Second Baseman

Archive Footage

Archive Footage

TitleYearStatusCharacter
DHL Presents Major League Baseball Hometown Heroes2006TV Mini-Series documentaryHimself

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